Britta's Letters from (and sometimes about) Berlin

Tuesday, 18 October 2016

Patience... Solitaire...Banana Solitaire...



I'm not blessed with it. PATIENCE , I mean. 
At the moment I take "Patience" - that's how we call your "Solitaire" - literally, and try to learn the game.  
For a long, long time I regarded it as an utter waste of time - the voices of my late parents urged me to do "something meaningful" instead.(I still have difficulties to watch TV in the afternoon!). 
But better late than never I try to free myself.  
I take small steps, patiently. On my own.  
Though Bananagrams, which, after Amelia Bullmore (wonderful DCI Gill Murray in Scott&Bailey) mentioned it in an interview, I ordered impatiently (the English version of course - and please don't laugh at my humble attempts) is even more to my gusto: 






“Be patient toward all that is unsolved in your heart and try to love the questions themselves" as our poet Rainer Maria Rilke said in "Letters to a Young Poet". 

I'll try. Have BUNCHes of them. Questions BANANAS!!! 


144 files for a Bananagram Solitaire. 

PATIENCE!! (Otherwise you go bananas)



17 comments:

  1. I'm not sure Rilke had solitaire in mind! What do you like about it? I rarely play, but I suppose for me it is a distraction that takes my mind off other thoughts. If I had the patience I would pick up my knitting, but I don't have it and wonder if I will ever finish those Christmas gifts I started 3 years ago.

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    1. Dear Shawn, I'm quite sure that he hadn't :-)
      What I like about Patience (I play it for a week now) is the little triumph when it proves to be successsful (as a cross-word-riddle) - and the haptic of the cards (I don't like it online). I seldom knitted, but long time ago when I needed order in chaos I did cross-stitch - for about half a year - then I stopped forever.

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  2. We used to play Solitaire and Patience a lot Britta especially as children ..... I'm not that good a much but I do have patience and discipline.
    .... and, you are so good at English.
    Our son and his wife and family are off to Berlin on Sunday ...... they love it. XXXX

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    1. Dear Jackie, discipline I have a lot - but patience I have to divide: patience for accomplishing things, drawings etc: yes. Patience for waiting for an important outcome in human relationships: I could sing with Queen: "We want it all, we want it now!" :-)
      I wish your son and his family a wonderful time in Berlin - one can contact me via my website brigittahuegel.de if wanted - I would enjoy to meet them. XXX

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  3. Dear Britta, "c'è più tempo che vita" (there is more time than life) - slow down and enjoy life now - my dear grandmother taught me this as a child; I'm also very impatient. :)
    Greeting Maria xx

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    1. Dear Maria - have you read what I wrote to Shawn concerning cross-stitching? The words of your grandmother sre so adorable that I am tempted to pick my needle up again (though nowadays it is easier: I have a saying in pink letters glued on the tiles in the bathroom...) ... and there are still many blank tiles in my kitchen. Though I have another saying from Shirley Conran: "Life is too short to stuff a mushroom!" - so: rapido, rapido :-)
      Greetings, Britta xxx

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  4. I used to be impatient. I gave it up, I don't know when. I don't miss it.

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    1. You are a marvel, Joanne, really! I wish I could - be wise - but till now it is more a Fata Morgana :-)

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  5. Now I know why one of the solitaire games I play is called Grandfather's Patience! There are about a dozen different solitaire games that I play on a regular basis. They keep my poor old brain on its toes.

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    1. Dear Emma, I admire you for being able to play so many sorts of Patience! I only know "The Little Harp" - well, I'm a beginner... had to learn to shuffle cards :-)

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  6. For many years, I have bought annuals of New York Times crossword puzzles. If I expect a wait somewhere, I'll tear out a page and take it with me. We all have our methods, eh?

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    1. As Inspector Morse, dear Geo., - I like crossword puzzles too, and think they are good for the little grey cells, eh? as Monsieur Poirot would say. But I also like Scrabble.

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  7. I still can hear that voice of my German mother like you.

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    1. Dear Yael, it is interesting how those voices and sayings stay. My father had a very keen sense of humour - so I often can hear him, and in cases of decision I am sometimes glad for it, but I don't like forbiddance by my late mother that might (?) have been ok for children.

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  8. Britta...From my earliest memories, my daddy played Solitaire every night... he'd sit at the kitchen table his cards spread out in front. I think it was his decompression time ..especially after he gave up smoking. Yes, he had an abundance of patience... so that would be a fitting name for his game. I can still hear the ripple of the cards as he shuffled and the flip of each card as he laid out the hand. I play Spider Solitaire online... no memorable sound or need to replace worn down cards... just the daily running down of the iPad battery! Thanks for a sweet memory of Daddy...now where did I stash that deck of cards? Smiles...Susan

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  9. Dear Susan, yes, a time to relax - and the sensual way you remember the experiences with cards (that's why I prefer them to the online game). The shuffle, the flip - and the joy when you finally bring the cards to their destination... (the online version calculated in the last third of the play that I will win - said "hurray!" - and that was it. End of game. But I want to put every card triumphantly down! (Though I do not like to shuffle them).

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