Britta's Letters from (and sometimes about) Berlin

Saturday, 8 August 2015

I just HAVE to show you this:

19 comments:

  1. Haha Britta …. lucky Sally although, it looks a little dangerous to me !! I'm not sure if I would have liked my children playing in one of those contraptions !!!!!! XXXX

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    1. I would have been worried sick, I think - especially when the little boy crept in, too! But the idea as such is great :-)

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  2. Eeeek! It is a wonderful way for the children to get fresh air I suppose. But oh my it looks scary.

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    1. It does look scary, Emma - and as to the "fresh" air: I'm not certain, looks a bit foggy to me. On the other hand: the little toddler seems to be quite content when her mother put her into that cage.

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  3. Always the inventive British, tough and resilient and never to be defeated in any circumstance.

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    1. I love inventions, especially British ones (I long for an Aga!). And the baby cage will have made you brave (and prepared the famous a stiff upper lip). No, honestly: I have the impression that the baby enjoys and is curious.

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    2. The stiff upper lip was the first thing that went through my mind.

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  4. Thanks for stirring the memory buds. Saturday mornings. The Lone Ranger at The Empire, but first the Newsreel. I remember I always thought the narrator had an interesting voice.

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    1. That is exactly what impressed me even more than the ingenious invention: the voice of the narrator - so clear, so gripping, so - cool!

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  5. Oh my goodness - that would have put me off heights for life - I have never seen anything so strange yet so inventive.

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    1. Maybe it would have trained us for heights? I know that Johann Wolfgang von Goethe trained himself to overcome his fear of heights by often climbing up the tower of the Strassburger Münster. When I was up in the Shard, I felt a little bit weak, looking down at wonderful London.

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  6. Dear Brigitta, I was a bit concerned until 0.50 into clip when I saw a sturdy metal diagonal support securely bolted to the uppermost part of the window frame. I consider the "baby cage" safe and would be surprised if any mishaps occurred.

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    1. Dear Geo., that's one thing I like in men (some women, of course, can do it too): the have an eye for construction, reliability, and inventions. I believe, that it was a man who invented/constructed these baby-cases.

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  7. Britta...what a wonderful voice! We don't have an abundance of television/radio folks with that resonating quality these days. Not sure that I would have trusted the cage contraption...even though Geo. pointed out the structural integrity! I think a desperate wife/mother "nagged" her engineer husband to invent this as a sanity saver! Hope all is well with you and yours...you had a fun, busy summer! Smiles...Susan

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  8. Dear Susan, I loved that voice too! Yes - all is well - we are simply melting in very hot Berlin, and I have a lot of work to do. After September (narrow boat England/Scotland) and Rome I will become more homely - too much travel is - too much :-)

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  9. Scary. At least one British council considered fitting them to their blocks of flats.

    Enjoy your narrowboating! When I was small we often went on boating holidays - on the Thames and the Norfolk Broads though, not the canals- although I've spent time on boats on them and I think it's great.

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    1. Thank you! I am looking forward to the trip - of course I am a bit unsure how to pack my suitcase... last time we had a mix of mild summer and one rainy day in Devizes. To ship the Thames sounds good to me!

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  10. I lived in Baron's Court for a while, but I imagine this was before my time. What I do remember is that my flat shook every time a train went past.

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    1. Once I saw a film (by Wim Wenders?) in black and white, where the train rushed by a lot of houses, and the pictures on the wall and the porcelain always danced a strange ballet. People say they get used to it - I wonder.
      If I remember right, Baron's Court has a lovely tube station (I 'collect' tube stations with my camera - very impressing inside: Mornington Crescent).

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