Britta's Letters from (and sometimes about) Berlin

Friday, 26 February 2016

Snow - again!

©Brigitta Huegel

I love the little vase that a famous German potter made - he used copper in the glaze, and it cracks so nicely emerald green on the darker ground. I have two vases by him - a big one and a small one, though I prefer the little one: just right for snowdrops.

©Brigitta Huegel

These husband brought from our garden in Hildesheim, and I felt a sudden pang of homesickness and nostalgia and burst into tears - though I absolutely don't want to go back. Strange.

Added: Richard Uhlemeyer vases.






18 comments:

  1. Snowdrops elevate even a little old jam jar. In a work of art, they become Nature's Masterpiece.
    Truly.

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    1. I love them in a jam jar or in a tiny child's hand too, Pondside.

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  2. Can we know the name of the potter who made your delightful little vase? - notstalgia is a strange emotion - it can hit us when we are least expecting it.

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    1. The ceramist's name is Richard Uhlemeyer. Born 1900 in Göttingen, started in around 1920 to visit the artisan craftwork school in Hannover.
      There are some exhibitions and some of his work is in artisan craftwork museums exhibited.

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    2. The big vase isn't quite to my taste - I only use it once a year: it looks stunning with copper beech branches in it.

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    3. They are lovely - the colouring in the small one is especially pleasing. I am going to look him up. I can picture copper beech branches looking good in the big one, and imagine daffodils and sunflowers could look nice in it too.

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    4. Sunflowers are lovely in it, daffodils seem too "small" for it - that's what I thought, at least, but I'll give it a try. I will try jonquil (pale), but I fear that only their heads will look out (that's why branches work so well). It must be something that is not too rigid (to be true, that vase always reminds me a bit of an urn :-)

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  3. All hope and happiness is in a little vase - very pretty indeed. In the language of flowers the snowdrop is a symbol of hope. "Collect a snowdrop on the first moonlit night after the end of January and you'll be happy all year round"
    Snowdrops here are also called "white teardrop" (lacrima bianca), you were nolstalgically on topic:) Greetings Maria x

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    1. Hope is always a good thing, thank you Maria, I didn't know that. I missed the moonlit January night (there weren't any snowdrops around), but I thought: "Well - why not now? Better than never" (often being more practical minded then nostalgic) - so I plucked yesterday night a few - in some moonlight! - on my balcony... :-)
      And thanks for 'lacrima bianca' - added that to my newly learned vocabulary - mille grazie!

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  4. The snowdrops are pretty. I would have enjoyed seeing the entire vase.

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    1. To show the vases as you requested, I added two photos above, Emma.

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    2. Thank you. I like the smaller one better.

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  5. Your photos are very artistic. The composition is perfect. The light atmospheric. Sort of sad.

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    1. Thank you, Gwil. I often wonder that a camera can express different moods well - and especially if two photographers take a picture of one person or the same object how different the outcome can be.

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  6. Replies
    1. Yes - and next I'll switch to my normal mood - and make the flowers smile.

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  7. The simplest of flowers that remind you of times past. Beautiful in their innocence.

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    1. You now gave me the idea why I mentioned in the answer to Pondside's comment the tiny hands of children - then we plucked them - or primroses (by now we all know how to behave, and wouldn't - but then it was shere joy!).

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